Whatever happened to a fair fight?

July 26, 2008

Here’s an idea – let’s completely disassemble both the Democratic and Republican parties. And, for good measure, the Greens and the Libertarians and every other political party fighting tooth and nail for ballot access in this country. Make everyone run as an independent. Everyone gets a fair shot. Let’s level the playing field, so that we are voting for a candidate, not for a party. No more DNC or RNC. Let’s get back to the idea of “whoever gets the most votes wins,” not “whoever is left over from the nearly meaningless primaries race and has the slickest and most well-funded campaign wins because the American people who bother to vote are blinded by their allegiance to a political party.”

This is what I’m sick of – people who just as quickly as they can shit will move their zealous allegiance from one candidate to another for the sake of the Party. So, it really doesn’t matter WHO we put on the ballot, does it? There is a guy who lives near me who is so ultra-Republican, whose lawn and vehicle are completely covered in candidates’ signs, stickers and such (we all know people like this), and who I sincerely believe would vote for a poodle if one were nominated for the GOP ticket.

Many people here in the blogosphere and in my day to day life know how I am torn about whether or not to take part in the political process anymore. Some of these people, in their efforts to sway me one way or the other, try to extol the virtues of either Obama or McCain – and I know damn well that these same people would be just as fervently extolling the virtues of Romney or Clinton or (fill in the blank) or (fill in the blank) if the primaries had turned out differently than they did.

Maybe it’s because I don’t like religion or sports, but I just don’t get the whole herd mentality – and I’m afraid you dyed-in-the-wool pols seem to have it just as badly as the religious wackos and those annoying Red Sox fans that surround me up here in New England. Change the starting line-up of any baseball team, for instance, and people will still “love their team”. Why? Because they’re all wearing the same stupid looking jerseys? The ballot seems to be no different – just throw some name on there of some distinguished Senator, so long as they have an (R) or a (D) after their name.

Advertisements

2 Responses to “Whatever happened to a fair fight?”

  1. Mardé Says:

    Who knows? Maybe you’re right. Maybe the political parties as we know them will disappear, or be eclipsed. Maybe the hyperconnectivity that’s here in this 21rst century via all the new communication gadgets and internet will enable goals beyond our wildest dreams, such as the goal you’re suggesting, Minds, namely, the fair fight. I just finished reading the transcript of a great talk, HYPERPOLITICS (AMERICAN STYLE), by a Mark Pesce at this year’s Personal Democracy Forum in which he shows what can happen with this hyperconnectivity. Pretty interesting!

  2. Mardé Says:

    Hey, Minds, here’s a new book by David Sirota you might be interested in, The Uprising: An Unauthorized Tour of the Populist Revolt Scaring Wall Street and Washington. Here’s a review on that web page by Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.) Sirota chronicles how ordinary citizens on the right and the left are marshaling their frustrations with the government into uprisings across the country and analyzes the effectiveness and longevity of their efforts. Citing developments as disparate as progressive political victories in the Montana state senate and the rise of the California Minutemen militia, the author weaves entertaining case studies, keeping his tone conversational, the narrative fast-paced and the content accessible. Sirota hits numerous high notes, including a fine elucidation of continuing Democratic support for the Iraq War, a breakdown of the ‘echo chamber’ qualities of beltway television shows like Hardball and salient observations of how and why the Democratic Party severed ties with the liberal uprising of the ’60s era. According to Sirota, “The activism and energy frothing today is disconnected and atomized. The only commonality between it all is rage.” It remains to be seen whether this rage will snowball into something large enough to upset entrenched political systems, but for the time being, this book presents a rousing account of the local uprisings already in effect.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: